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will increase the complexity of morphology/syntax forms (word/sentence forms) by producing __ to ___ % above baseline or ___ % of the time as measured by __________ (observations, teacher/SLP-made
probes, pre/post test, an oral language sample, story retelling, and/or written work).
1 Use regular/irregular plural forms in conversation and written work.
2 Demonstrate understanding of the plural/singular concept by pointing to pictures and/or objects depicting both
plural and singular concepts when asked to, "Show me noun." or "Show me nouns."
3 Use (number) + (plural forms), when asked, "What do you see?"
4 Use regular and irregular plural forms during speaking tasks at the sentence and conversation levels.
5 Use singular and plural forms in written work.
6 Use possessive forms in conversation and written work.
7 Use possessive forms (Mary's) when modeled or asked by the clinician, "Whose is this?"
8 Use possessive forms with an article (the dog's) when asked by the clinician.
9 Express the possessive relationship between two nouns in a sentence format ("The coat's zipper is broken." or"Mary's book is lost.")
10 Use possessives in a negative sentence to indicate non-possession ("It's not Mary's.")
11 Use possessives during speaking tasks at the sentence and conversational levels.
12 Use the possessive for in written work.
13 Use the definite article "the" and the indefinite article "a" in conversation and written work.
14 Use comparison (er) and superlative (est) forms in conversation/written work.
15 Point to the appropriate picture indicating the concepts of comparisons and superlative of 2/3 objects, persons, events, or ideas, when requested to do such actions as, "Show me the bigger apple.")
16 Compare 2/3 objects, persons, events. or ideas Using identical qualities or attributes, such as: size. color, width, age, taste, odor, attractiveness, affect, height, temperature, speed, texture, temperament such as, "Spring is cooler than summer."
17 Compare 213 objects, persons, events, or ideas using irregular comparative and superlative forms which change their forms such as, good/better/best.
18 Use regular/irregular past tense verb forms, such as "jumped", "went" to describe a past event or tell a story in conversation and written work.
19 Say (I + verbed) when describing a recently-completed action u p n being asked, "What did you do?"
20 Say the past tense regular verbs in sentences when describing actions.
21 Use irregular past tense verb forms (i.e. ran, ate)
22 Use regular and irregular past tense verb forms at the sentence and conversational levels
23 Use past tense regular/irregular verbs in written work.
24 Use regular/irregular third person singular verb forms, such as "jumps", '"goes" when describing recurring or habitual action in conversation and written work.
25 Use regular/irregular third person singular verb forms in 2-words, such as "She/He/It + verbs" when asked. "What does she/he/it do?'
26 Use regular/irregular third person singular verb forms at the sentence and conversational levels
27 Use regular/irregular third person singular verb forms in written work.
28 Use the present/past copula (verb to be) verb forms such as (am/is/are was/were) when describing objects. people, ideas, and events in conversation and written work.
29 Use the present tense copula verb forms in a two-word phrase such as, (I am. You are. He/She is. We are. They are.) when asked a question such as, "Who is hungry?" or "Who is running?"
30 Use present tense copula verb forms (am, is, are) when identifying/labeling objects or people such as, "It is a dog."
31 Use present tense copula verb forms (am, is, are) when describing nouns in sentences (I am // You are / I He/She/lt is + adjective).
32 Use past tense copula verb forms (was, were) when describing nouns in sentences (I was ii You were // He/She/It was + adjective.)
33 Use present and past tense copula verb forms at the Sentence and conversation levels
34 Use present and past tense copula verb forms in written work
35 Use present/past auxiliary verbs 'You be" such as, (am running) when asked to describe an ongoing action in conversation and written work
36 Use have auxiliary verb forms + the past participate in conversation and written work
37 Use singular and plural subjective personal pronouns (I/you/he/she/we/ you/they) in conversation and written work.
38 Use singular and plural objective personal pronouns (me/you/him/her/ us/you/them) in conversation and written work.
39 Differentiate gender for the objective third person singular pronouns "him/her"'.
40 Differentiate singular (me/you/him/her) and plural (us/you/them] objective personal pronouns.
41 Determine if a sentence, which contains an objective personal pronoun (me/you/him/her/us/them) correctly refers to the previous sentence, such as: "1 gave the pencils to Bill. The pencils belong to her.''
42 Use objective personal pronouns at the sentence and conversational levels.
43 Use objective personal pronouns in written work
44 Use singular and plural possessive personal pronouns (mine/yours/his/hers/ours/yours/theirs) in conversation and written work
45 Differentiate gender for the possessive third person personal singular pronouns "his/hers"
46 Differentiate singular (mine/yours/his/hers) and plural (ours/yours/theirs) possessive personal pronouns
47 Determine if a sentence, which contains a possessive personal pronoun (mine/yours/his/hers/ours/theirs) correctly refers to the previous sentence, such as: "The apple belongs to me. The apple is yours."
48 Use possessive personal pronouns at the sentence and conversational levels.
49 Use possessive personal pronouns in written work.
50 Use singular and plural reflexive personal pronouns (myself/yourself/himself/herself/ourselves/yourselves/themselves) in conversation and written work.
51 Differentiate gender for the reflexive third person personal singular pronouns "himself/herself."
52 Differentiate singular (myself/yourself/himself/herself) and plural (ourselves/yourselves/themselves) reflexive personal pronouns
53 Use reflexive personal pronouns at the sentence and conversational levels.
54 Use reflexive personal pronouns in written work
55 Use indefinite pronouns (all, another. any, anybody, anyone, anything, both, each, either, everybody, everyone, everything. few. many, most, neither, nobody, none, nothing, no one, one, other, several, some, somebody, someone, something, such) in conversation and written work.
56 Use demonstrative pronouns (it, this, that, these, those) in conversation and written work.
57 Determine if a demonstrative pronoun is used correctly in a sentence presented by the clinicians, such as: "I want a red pen." I want these."
58 Request an object or objects that were placed near and far using the following format, "May I have (this/that/these/those) + object(s)?"
59 Use demonstrative pronouns at the sentence and conversational levels.
60 Use demonstrative pronouns in written work.
61 Use future tense by combining "will + verb in conversation and written work.
62 Use prepositional phrases in sentences during conversation and written work
63 Direct the behavior of others using imperative sentences, such as: (Sit
64 Answer/Ask questions which require a "yes/no" response by using interrogative sentences in conversation and written work.
65 Nod "yes" or "no" when asked simple yes/no questions.
66 Answer the following types of simple yes/no questions: "Do you want --?" Is your name (name) here?" "Do you want/have/see/etc.. ---?" "Are you (adjective)?" "Can you (verb)?" "Can I have it?" "Are you ready?" "Have you finished?"
67 Ask a yes/no question by using rising intonation on the end of a word, phrase, or sentence such as, "Go?' "That's your car?"
68 Ask a yes/no question by beginning a sentence with an auxiliary verb such as, "Can you do it?" "Should we go?" "Is it gone?"
69 Ask a yes/no question by beginning a sentence with a "do" auxiliary form: "Do you want to play?" "Did you play?"
70 Make a statement that is presumed to be true and then request verification by using an auxiliary verb at the beginning of a Tag Question: "You will go, won't you?" I' You can't go, can you?" "You saw it, didn't you?"
71 Respond to polite requests: "Can I have some candy?"

will increase the appropriate use of answer/ask questions using interrogative sentences in conversation and written work to ____ % above baseline or ____ % accuracy as measured by ___________.
1 Match "wh" forms to words and phrases when asked such questions as: "Do the following phrases tell "who" or"what? (my mom, Beth. the vase).
2 Match a "wh" question form to an answer: "John went to the park." Which question does that answer: '"Where did John go"? or "When did John go?"
3 Create a "wh" question. when the declarative sentence and first word of the question are given, in sentences such as, Next week we are going to the zoo. Finish this question: When -_-? Dad will take us to the zoo. Finish this question: Who-_-?
4 Create a "wh" question designed to gather specific information during an elicitation activity such as, "Ask her where she lives."
5 The student will ask "wh" questions: (What is it? Where? Who? What + doing? Whose? What is it? What does? How many? Why? How much? How long (duration) How far? How often? When?):
6 The student will answer the following type of "wh" questions: (What is it? Where? Who? What + doing? Whose? What is it? What does? How many? Why? How much? How long (duration?) How far? How often? When?).
7 The student will answer questions presented in the curriculum by finding evidence in written material that supports the answer.
8 Ask and respond appropriately to a rhetorical question mat does not require a response nor request action.
9 Identify which questions ask for information, which request action. and which make a comment and are considered rhetorical (What did you do last weekend? Could you feed my dog? How can it rain for so many days in a row?).
10 Use modals (can/could/may/shall/should/will/would/must) to refer to slates of obligation, possibility, doubt, necessity, wishes, promises, and conditions contrary to fact in conversation and written work
11 Use the modal can to express permission, ability to, and knowledge of how to do something in sentences ("Mom says I can go with you? She can drive the car.")
12 Use the modal could to express choice, a shade of doubt, or permission in sentences. {Could you write this
13 Use the modal may to express permission or likelihood in sentences ("You may go to the zoo. It may snow.").
14 The student will use the modal shall to express futurity in first person questions and in formal writing in sentences ("shall i help you? we shall expect you for dinner. ")
15 The student will use the modal should to express appropriateness, expectations, and obligations in sentences ("Children should be seen and not heard. Should we go to the beach this weekend?)
16 The student will use the modal will to express futurity, and refer to intention, willingness. And capability in sentences ("I promise they will meet you at the library I'll treat you to a cup of coffee.).
17 The student will use the modal would to express conditions contrary to fact or to request in sentences ["1 would love to have some hot chocolate. I would have liked the dance.").
18 The student will use the modal must to express necessity and obligations in sentences ("He must pay the bookfine. He must return the book now.)
19 Use negative sentences to stop an action, protest, confirm/disconfirm, and complain in conversation and written work.
20 Answer with a single answer, "no" when asked a question
21 Use negative sentence which expresses the student's desire for the listener to stop an action in sentences ("Don't drop it.").
22 Use negative sentences to serve as a protest of the listener's belief system in sentences ("It's not broken. He can't
play.).
23 Use negative sentences to express he does not want to do something in sentences ("I don't want to go. I won't.)
24 Use negative sentences to confirm or disconfirm a statement in sentences ["no, i didn't. He is not. This isn't mine. ").
25 Use a negative sentence when asked to do something, but is not provided with the materials needed to do it, or when confronted with an unexpected difficulty or condition that is not working ("I don't have it." "There isn't any." "I can't open it.).
26 Use negative forms in sentences and conversation.
27 Use negative forms in written work.
28 lnterpret/use/answer passive sentences in conversation and written work.
29 Interpret the meaning of a passive sentence by explaining how the meaning changes in sentences (The girl read
the book. The book was read by the boy.)
30 Listen to a sentence and answer a question determining the agent and the recipient: (The book was bought by the teacher. Who did the buying?).
31 Interpret the meaning of a passive sentence by paraphrasing a declarative1 passive sentence (The bone was eaten by the dog. Say it another way. Start with 'The dog.").
32 Answer passive sentences in conversation and written wok.
33 Use passive sentences in conversation and written work.
34 Use compound and complex sentences in conversation and written work.
35 Use coordinated conjunctions (and, but, or) to connect two independent sentences.
36 Use subordinated conjunctions (after, although, as, as much as, as if, as soon as, because, before, for, how, if, i f . . . then. in order that, inasmuch as, provided, since, so, so that, than, that, though. till. unless, until, when, whenever, where, whether) to initiate and connect adverbial clauses in complex sentences.
37 Create two base sentences from one longer complex/compound sentence (Thai man, who is teaching the class, is the principal. or That man is teaching the class. He is the principal.).
38 Combine two sentences into one longer, complex/compound sentence (The dog came home. He was hungry. or The dog, that was hungry, came home).
39 Use coordinated and complex sentences in conversation.
40 Use coordinated and complex sentences in written work.

increase the appropriate use of classroom discourse skills to _____% above baseline or ____ % accuracy as measured by ___________.
1 Answer literal comprehension questions about a narrative that describes the character(s), setting, main idea/theme/primary goal or problem, and major events in the story, including a beginning, middle and end.
2 Answer interpretive comprehension questions about a narrative such as: '"What do you think will happen next in the story? Why? How did the characters feel about one another? What lesson could be learned from this story?"
3 Understand/use cohesive markers in order to link ideas throughout a story by using linguistic markers whose meaning cannot be understood without information found in other parts of the story or with proper inferential skills.
4 Understand a story utilizing inferential comprehension skills as demonstrated when he answers questions about: why characters behaved as they did, stating the characters' goals and motivations. explain the feelings of characters at certain points of the story, predicting outcomes, drawing conclusions.
5 Answer evaluative comprehension questions about a narrative such as: "Do you think this story could really happen? If you could change the end of the story, how would you do it? Why did the author select the point of view that was chosen?"
6 Retell a story giving the following information: an introduction, time and place of story, main character, names of other characters, primary story problem, major events, story order, how problem was solved, story ending.
7 Tell a narrative story using the complete elements of a story: initiating event, explanation of characters feelings, goal oriented behavior, evidence of a plan, planned attempts, direct consequence, beginning of a resolution.
8 Tell a narrative story using 8 story parts: description of characters, when story took place, where story took place, story problem, goals of the characters, 14 sequence of events to achieve goals, ending, and reaction and feelings of characters.
9 Create a narrative writing sample, recounting a personal experience based on something that really happened that includes: identifiable storyline with a beginning, middle, and an end, and a focus illustrated by the author:
10 Create an imaginative writing sample, which is not based on a personal experience but on the writer's imagination or fiction, in which the author creates a scene, situation, or storyline with characters.
11 Present an oral presentation representing expository information which provides factual information explanations, clarifications, or definitions based on research.
12 Create an expository writing sample which provides factual information, explanations, clarifications, or definitions based on research.
13 Present a persuasive oral presentation in order to convince the listener to agree with a particular point of view or to persuade the listener to take a special action.
14 Create a persuasive writing sample in order to convince the reader to agree with a particular point of view or to persuade the reader to take a specific action.
15 Read an expository text and summarize what was read.
16 Draw conclusions from what was read.
17 Explain the process to appropriately answer test taking vocabulary.